Influences from Book of Judges, Abimelech

abimelech-millstone

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salting_the_earth

Salting the Earth

The Book of Judges (9:45) says that Abimelech, the judge of the Israelites, sowed his own capital, Shechem, with salt, c. 1050 BC, after quelling a revolt against him. This may have been part of a ḥērem ritual[2] (compare with “salt in the Bible“).

Starting in the 19th century,[7] various texts claim that the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus Africanus plowed over and sowed the city of Carthage with salt after defeating it in the Third Punic War (146 BC), sacking it, and forcing the survivors into slavery. However, no ancient sources exist documenting the salting itself. The Carthage story is a later invention, probably modeled on the story of Shechem.[8] The ritual of symbolically drawing a plow over the site of a city is, however, mentioned in ancient sources, though not in reference to Carthage specifically.[9]

….

Killed by a Stone

Compare Judges 9:

50 Next Abimelech went to Thebez and besieged it and captured it. 51 Inside the city, however, was a strong tower, to which all the men and women—all the people of the city—had fled. They had locked themselves in and climbed up on the tower roof. 52 Abimelech went to the tower and attacked it. But as he approached the entrance to the tower to set it on fire, 53 a woman dropped an upper millstone on his head and cracked his skull.

….

The death of Pyrrhus by a tile flung down by a woman as he rode into the town of Argos is an historic parallel (Pausan. 1:13). The ringleader of an attack on the Jews, who had taken refuge in York Castle in 1190, was similarly killed.

….

And v. 54:  
Hurriedly [Abimelech] called to his armor-bearer, “Draw your sword and kill me, so that they can’t say, ‘A woman killed him.’” So his servant ran him through, and he died. ….


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrrhus_of_Epirus
Whether [Pyrrhus] was alive or not after the blow is dubious, but his death was assured when a Macedonian soldier named Zopyrus, though frightened by the look on the face of the unconscious king, hesitantly and ineptly beheaded his motionless body.

Advertisements

New Pharaoh Senebkay Found

Mystery tomb identified by wall decoration: Discovery of pharoah Senebkay’s  last resting place could lead to more royal finds

  • University of Pennsylvania and the  Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities experts identified the tomb by an inscription  on the wall of his burial chamber
  • It is the first time that any trace of  the pharaoh has been found
  • Tomb was unearthed at the  Abydos archaeological site, near the city of Sohag, Egypt and was found next to  another recently-discovered royal tomb

BySarah Griffiths

PUBLISHED:               09:48 GMT, 16 January 2014      | UPDATED:              12:38 GMT, 16  January 2014

The tomb of an unknown ruler has been  discovered, which could help archaeologists find more lost Ancient Egyptian  pharaohs.

Experts identified the tomb of Senebkay by an  inscription on the wall of his burial chamber, which was unearthed at the Abydos  archaeological site, near the city of Sohag, Egypt.

It is the first time that any trace of the  pharaoh has been found.

Archaeologists from the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities and the University of Pennsylvania identified the tomb of Senebkay by drawings on the wall of his burial chamber (pictured), which was unearthed in the Abydos archaeological site

+5

Archaeologists from the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities  and the University of Pennsylvania identified the tomb of Senebkay by drawings  on the wall of his burial chamber (pictured), which was unearthed in the Abydos  archaeological site

Ali Asfar, head of antiquities for the  Egyptian government said that only fragments of the name have previously been  seen on an ancient list of Egyptian rulers.

‘This was the first time in history to  discover the king,’ he told NBC News.

It is thought that Senebkay lived around  3,650 years ago at a time when rulers battled for power before the rise of  Egypt’s New Kingdom in 1550 BC.

Painted decoration in the burial chamber of Senebkay is pictured left. Archaeologists examine Senebkay's skeleton on the right. While his body was mummified, it is thought Senebkay's remains were pulled apart by robbers looking for treasures, who also plundered the pharaoh's tomb

+5

Painted decoration in the burial chamber of Senebkay is  pictured left. Archaeologists examine Senebkay’s skeleton on the right. While  his body was mummified, it is thought Senebkay’s remains were pulled apart by  robbers looking for treasures, who also plundered the pharaoh’s tomb

The lost tomb was discovered by a team of  archaeologists from the University of Pennsylvania, who came across it  while  excavating the tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I, who was buried  nearby.

Senebkay’s final resting place appears to have  been plundered because the skeleton is pulled apart, but it is estimated that  the ruler was aged around 45 when he died and measured five ft 10  inches.

Josef Wegner of the university, who led the  dig, believes the new find could lead to the discovery of more pharaohs and  could help piece together the gaps in knowledge about the rulers of Ancient  Egypt.

The lost tomb (pictured) was discovered by a team of archaeologists from the University of Pennsylvania, who came across it while excavating the tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I, who was buried nearby

+5

The lost tomb (pictured) was discovered by a team of  archaeologists from the University of Pennsylvania, who came across it while  excavating the tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I, who was buried nearby

The tomb was discovered at the Abydos site (pictured) near Sohag in Egypt and could lead to more royal tombs being unearthed. Last week it was announced that the same archaeological team had uncovered the Tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I

+5

The tomb was discovered at the Abydos site (pictured)  near Sohag in Egypt and could lead to more royal tombs being unearthed. Last  week it was announced that the same archaeological team had uncovered the Tomb  of pharaoh Sobekhotep I

‘We discovered an unknown king plus a lost  dynasty. It looks likely that all of the 16 kings are all buried there,’ he  said.

‘We now have the tomb for first or second  king of this dynasty. There should be a whole series of the  others.’

Describing the moment the archaeologists came  across the tomb, he explained that they found the entrance first, which led them  down to the burial chamber, made of limestone and painted with cartouches of the  pharaoh.

Last week it was announced that a vast 3,800-year-old quartzite sarcophagus belongs to a little-known 13th dynasty king, Sobekhotep I. It was discovered by an international team of researchers who deciphered inscriptions to link it to its owner

+5

Last week it was announced that a vast 3,800-year-old  quartzite sarcophagus belongs to a little-known 13th dynasty king, Sobekhotep I.  It was discovered by an international team of researchers who deciphered  inscriptions to link it to its owner

‘In Abydos there is lots of sand and  everything is deeply buried. You can dig day after day, and then this….We were  standing there looking dumbfounded at the colourful wall decoration,’ he  said.

While robbers had stripped the tomb, a  re-used burial chest had the engraving of the ruler’s name on the  wood.

The experts said the re-use of materials  suggests a lack of stability and wealth at a time when the kingdom was  fragmented.

…AND THE TOMB OF PHARAOH SOBEKHOTEP WAS IDENTIFIED LAST  WEEK

A huge pink tomb of an ancient Egyptian  pharaoh was identified approximately one year after it was discovered, it was  announced last week.

The vast 3,800-year-old quartzite sarcophagus  belongs to a little-known 13th Dynasty king called Sobekhotep I, according to  the Egyptian government.

The 60 tonne sarcophagus was discovered by  the same team of archaeologists at the Abydos site and

The same team or researchers from the  University of Pennsylvania and Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry deciphered stone  pieces inscribed with the pharaoh’s name, which also show him sitting on a  throne, to link the tomb to its owner.

‘He is likely the first who ruled Egypt at  the start of the 13th Dynasty during the second intermediate period,’ the  minister said.

King Sobekhotep I is thought to have ruled  the 13th Dynasty but little is known about him and his kingdom or even when the  dynasty began exactly, which makes the discovery particularly  important.

Historians believe that it began sometime  between 1803BC and 1781BC but they are keen to establish a precise  date.

He is thought to have ruled for almost five  years, which was ‘the longest rule at this time’ according to ministry official  Ayman El-Damarani.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2540423/Mystery-tomb-identified-wall-decoration-Discovery-pharoah-Senebkays-resting-place-lead-royal-finds.html#ixzz2qt6Nuq1u

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook